“Reviews are not done by robots and we don’t reject tasks lightly”

Lucie has been a reviewer for the International team since February 2017. The international review team reviews submissions mainly for United Kingdom, Norway, Denmark and Sweden and sometimes review for other countries as well.

 

Why did you start at Roamler?
Being a ‘reviewer’ for an app sounded like a super futuristic and flexible job compared to what most of my fellow students were doing (working in restaurants and bars), so I was really intrigued. I downloaded the app and tried out some tasks, enjoyed them, and then decided to apply!

What do you do besides Roamler?
I was studying up until last summer, so about half of the time that I’ve been working at Roamler I was attending university, writing my thesis and doing some voluntary work. I’ve also spent time abroad, in London and Canada with my family, and on holiday. In the future, I plan to travel some more and take full advantage of working online!

In her year at Roamler (“I can’t believe it has been a year!”) Lucie reviewed around 10.000 submissions. Not surprisingly, most time was spend on reviewing paid tasks, but she also reviewed level 1 training tasks and creative tasks.

What do you like or dislike about reviewing at Roamler?
The flexibility of this job is amazing, but I’m going to be obvious and say that most of all I love the people who work at Roamler. There’s a great teamwork vibe between the reviewers, so even when we are working remotely, we are always in contact and helping each other out.

I’m a somewhat technologically challenged person, so sometimes working in such a techy environment can be frustrating. This is mainly when I can’t solve Roamlers’ technological problems, which is most of the time if “try uninstalling and reinstalling the app” doesn’t work.

Creative tasks are usually the most fun to review, because you might find something out about the Roamler, or see a cute photo of someone’s pet. I really like not having to reject tasks and disappoint (or anger) the Roamlers, and with these tasks there isn’t the pressure to be so strict. It’s always good to see that the Roamlers enjoy doing them too.

What can you tell Roamlers about your work as a reviewer?
First is that we don’t reject lightly, or for fun. I usually feel really, really bad about it, but there’s always a reason!

Second thing that is important to share is that reviewers are human beings too! It can feel more like we’re robots (yes, we’ve been told that before) since we’re communicating through an app, but we’re not, and we really appreciate polite Roamlers. We share kind messages we receive from Roamlers with each other to keep us going

Did you ever made a mistake with reviewing and what happened?
Yes! A classic example: accidentally clicking ‘accept’ instead of ‘reject’. Or sometimes a Roamler will point out a mistake in my feedback, then I just swallow my pride and apologise. They’re usually very gracious.

Do you have tips on Roamlers on performing paid tasks?
It always frustrates me how often I have to reject a task because a Roamler hasn’t properly read just one question. For example, if the question asks for an overview photo, we don’t want to see a close up. It is a mistake that could have been prevented and I wouldn’t have needed to reject the submission.

To avoid mistakes, my tip for Roamlers is to double check your submission before submitting! Please, never ever photograph the floor. If in doubt of what to photograph, take an overview photo! We can only judge the situation in a store from what you tell us in your submission – we love to see that ‘optional comments’ section being used.

To perform more tasks, just grab them while you can. Try and fit them in while you’re taking a break from work, or running errands. You shouldn’t underestimate how quickly they can go!

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